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July 21, 2003 // UPDATED 10:59 am - April 30, 2007
By: Ellen Nigon & April Wooster
Ellen Nigon & April Wooster

Various Local Business Stories

New Union becomes 3 Degrees

The New Union, a Christian music venue in northeast Minneapolis, is moving Downtown. The New Union will become Club 3 Degrees when it moves to 113 N. 5th St. this October.

"We're a nonalcoholic, smoke-free Christian music venue," said Shannon McGrath, marketing and events director for Club 3 Degrees.

According to McGrath, artists who will perform at Club 3 Degrees are "anyone who professes Jesus Christ as their Lord and savior and talks about that in their music

or plays music that has a positive message."

When it opens this fall, Club 3 Degrees will include a caf, c.d. store, stage, dance floor and seating for a capacity of around 1,700.

Club 3 Degrees will be open Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights from early evening until approximately 3 a.m.

--Ellen Nigon

One Kuhlman, then another, pop up Downtown

A men's clothing store called Kuhlman is open in the Warehouse District, and plans are underway for another location in the Downtown Core's Gaviidae Common.

Founded by Scott Kuhlman and Dan Capetz, the Kuhlman Co. opened its first retail store in the Warehouse District at 701 N. 3rd St about a month ago. This is not the part of the Warehouse District lined with bars and entertainment venues. It's the roughhewn area of the Warehouse District that still holds tenuous ties to its warehousing history.

Although an unconventional location for a burgeoning men's clothing store, Kuhlman said the neighborhood is perfect for his business.

"We're trying to keep prices in line. If we go into a high-rent district, the first thing we'll have to do is raise prices," Kuhlman said. "We think the Warehouse District is an up-and-coming place with all the new housing and new shops opening everywhere. Little individual specialty shops are popping up across the country in very nontraditional areas. I think the Warehouse District is one of them."

The clothes designed and sold at Kuhlman are traditional, with a twist. "We take a gray suit fabric that any man in America could wear and does wear, but rather than put a gray lining to the coat, we'll put a purple lining," Kuhlman said. "We're creating garments that are traditional in a sense but they have that one element or detail to it that sets it apart from anything else in the marketplace."

According to Kuhlman, their clothes are also less expensive than other garments of this quality.

"We're using factories that the top designers in the world use. Yet, we're bringing them to the marketplace without several layers in between it," Kuhlman said. "Our suits are $495 and $695, and that's it."

Kuhlman plans to open a store that specializes in shirts on the first floor of Gaviidae's Saks Fifth Avenue wing, 651 Nicollet Mall.

"Our dress shirts and sports shirts are unique in the sense that they're not just solid shirts. It's a lot of stripes and a lot of colors," Kuhlman said.

Shirts will cost $55, $75 and $95.

After opening the shirt shop in Gaviidae, Kuhlman said he hopes to go national with the Kuhlman brand.

--Ellen Nigon

Mill City Museum to get restaurant

The Mill City Museum will introduce a caf open to museum patrons and non-patrons alike along with its official grand opening Saturday, Sept. 13.

River Cafe by D'Amico Catering will serve soups, salads, sandwiches and pizza. The cafe will seat about 60 people outside its spot on the museum's main floor, according to D'Amico Director of Catering Sales Linda Adam-Mellang. Food can also be taken to go.

The caf will be open during regular museum hours: Tuesdays through Saturdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sundays noon-5 p.m. On the first Thursday of every month, hours extend until 9 p.m.

Mill City Museum is located at 704 S. 2nd St. on the west bank of the Mississippi River. The museum tells the history of Minneapolis' flour-milling industry through interactive exhibits. Mill City also rents space for special events and offers D'Amico catering. For more information about Mill City and its grand opening, call 341-7555 or visit www.millcitymuseum.org.

--April Wooster