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November 8, 2010
By: Sarah McKenzie
Sarah McKenzie
‘The Secrets of People Who Never Get Sick’

How badly do you want to avoid a cold this winter?

Would you eat a whole clove of garlic? Or how about dousing your head in hydrogen peroxide or taking an ice cold shower?

Probably doesn’t sound too appealing, but those are some of the habits of people featured in Gene Stone’s new book, “The Secrets of People Who Never Get Sick.”

Stone will be discussing his new book at Magers & Quinn Booksellers, 3038 Hennepin Ave. S., on Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m.

Stone, a veteran health journalist, has tried nearly all of the 25 secrets featured in his book with the exception of eating chicken soup — something he had to pass up since he’s a vegan. Many of the secrets featured in the book are novel and seem a bit unusual, but Stone insists they all have some research to back them up.

He reached out to sources and acquaintances to find healthy people who are successful in eluding colds and flu symptoms that afflict so many of us.

“Basically what I discovered is that even though some of these secrets contradict one another, the one thing they really share is that every single person in the book really believes in their secret,” Stone said during a recent interview. “They have a very positive attitude. … Every person in this book makes that secret an integral part of their life. Mr. Cold Shower takes a cold shower every day. Ms. Garlic — she has garlic all the time. That’s kind of the ultimate secret to good health — making good health a priority.”

While some of the secrets appear to be a bit extreme, there are many suggestions that are common sense good health habits, such as napping, managing stress and doing yoga.

“The underlying agenda here is at a time when health costs are spiraling and there are flus everywhere, what I’m really trying to stay is try to take some responsibility for your health,” Stone said. “There are many things you can do on your own to take care of your health.”

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‘Paddle North’

Writer Greg Breining and photographer Layne Kennedy are out with a gorgeous new book, “Paddle North,” showcasing the beautiful landscape of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and Quetico Provincial Park in Canada.

If you haven’t been on a canoe trip before to this breathtaking region of Northern Minnesota, this book will likely inspire you to start planning one.

Breining and Kennedy have spent a lot of time paddling and camping in the area.

“Meditations on map making and canoe building, on the rock-pine-water combination that defines the northland, on winter weather and forest fire are all accompanied by views of sparkling lakes and rocky cliffs, challenging portages, campfire reflections, and friendships forged away from the hustle of everyday life,” reads a promotional piece on the book. “Together, these stories and images convey a sense of reverence for the landscape and the playful joy felt by those who paddle north.”

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‘Fierce and True’

The Children’s Theatre Company has released a collection of plays aimed a teen audiences called “Fierce and True.”

In an effort to reach out to 12 to 18 year olds and delve into the often complicated issues young people face during those years, the theatre company started commissioning plays for teens. Four standout productions, including “Anon(ymous)” by Naomi Iizuka, “The Lost Boys of Sudan” by Lonnie Carter, “Five Fingers of Funk” by Will Power and “Prom” by Whit MacLaughlin and New Paradise Laboratories are featured in “Fierce and True.”