Catholic Eldercare is looking to develop a corner of Broadway & 2nd in Northeast Minneapolis into senior housing. Image courtesy of Google Maps

Catholic Eldercare is looking to develop a corner of Broadway & 2nd in Northeast Minneapolis into senior housing. Image courtesy of Google Maps

Catholic Eldercare set to break ground this summer on senior apts

Updated: April 20, 2017 - 1:14 pm

Project comes as housing provider honors founder with name change

Senior housing provider Catholic Eldercare is planning to break ground on a 65-unit apartment building near its Northeast Minneapolis campus this summer.

The market-rate building, planned for the St. Anthony West neighborhood near Broadway & Second, will target seniors age 62 and older. Catholic Eldercare is slated to break ground on the currently nameless project this August.

“This area has been sorely lacking in an independent senior living option that will provide the necessary services and supports needed by adults as we age,” said CEO and President Dan Johnson in a statement. “It will allow current residents of Northeast and others the opportunity to age in community, while expanding Catholic Eldercare’s continuum of care.”

The project comes as the nonprofit is renaming its campus after co-founder Al Hofstede, the first Catholic mayor of Minneapolis, as well as its youngest. Hofstede, who grew up in Northeast and served on the City Council and Metropolitan Council, died last September at 75.

The Albert J. Hofstede Care Center campus includes three senior residences, an adult day care program and a nursing home. Catholic Eldercare recently expanded its range of care with a three-story, $10-million Transitional Care Unit facility that opened last fall with 24 rooms for elderly and frail clients who require short-term care.

“We are happy and humbled to rename our campus in honor of Al Hofstede, who served the City of Minneapolis, the greater metropolitan area and the Northeast community so faithfully during his lifetime,” Johnson said.

The new apartment building will add independent living to the nonprofit’s properties. Catholic Eldercare had owned an apartment building it developed as senior housing kiddy corner from the site, but it sold it last summer. It expects to open the senior housing project next summer.

“Our message to seniors looking for housing is that if your needs change, we can respond without your having to necessarily move to a new community,” Johnson said.