Catholic Eldercare is looking to develop a corner of Broadway & 2nd in Northeast Minneapolis into senior housing. Image courtesy of Google Maps

Catholic Eldercare is looking to develop a corner of Broadway & 2nd in Northeast Minneapolis into senior housing. Image courtesy of Google Maps

Catholic Eldercare plans new senior housing community in Northeast

Updated: March 2, 2017 - 10:52 am

CEO envisions project as a market-rate extension of its campus

Catholic Eldercare is planning a 65-unit apartment building for seniors at the corner of 2nd & Broadway in Northeast Minneapolis.

The market-rate project, which would target seniors age 62 and older, would tap into pent-up demand for senior housing in and around downtown Minneapolis. Dan Johnson, Catholic Eldercare’s president and CEO, said the project would add a new type of property for the longstanding senior housing provider, which owns and operates a nursing home, assisted living apartments and a new transitional care unit facility at its nearby campus.

“It would add a dimension we’re missing: market-rate independent housing with services,” he said. “It’s an opportunity for someone, well like me, who’s tired of taking care of their house and yard… It has all the amenities of downtown without the downtown prices.”

Catholic Eldercare already owns the 1.3-acre site, located along Broadway Street Northeast between 2nd and University avenues in the St. Anthony West neighborhood. The proposal is located kitty corner from 1101 on Main, an apartment building originally developed by Catholic Eldercare as senior housing. The developer sold it last summer. Johnson said they found Broadway Street to be a barrier for its older residents.

The building would have a dining program and café run by Catholic Eldercare for residents and guests, though it wouldn’t be open to the public.

Catholic Eldercare expanded its campus last year with a three-story, $10-million transitional care unit facility, which features 24 rooms to temporarily house elderly and frail clients with chronic conditions who are coming from a hospital and need additional short-term care. The nearly 35-year-old housing provider operates a 150-bed nursing home, 53 apartments of assisted living and the 150-year-old St. Anthony of Padua Chapel at its campus, located on the block just southwest of its new proposal.

Johnson said Minneapolis lacks this type of market-rate senior housing.

Ecumen, a nonprofit developer based in Shoreview, recently opened a similar senior living community in downtown Minneapolis with 86 units of independent-living apartments. Episcopal Homes, a St. Paul-based nonprofit developer, had tried to build senior housing in the Loring Park neighborhood in 2015, which faced pushback due to its height.

Catholic Eldercare’s project is slated for discussion at the St. Anthony West Neighborhood Organization (STAWNO) Land Use and Planning Committee’s March 2 meeting. It would then move to the full board on March 9.